9/4/09

September 2009 Prize Sponsors

Last month's prize winners announced HERE.

Please take a moment to learn more about our wonderfully generous sponsors.


Farm Girl by Karen Jones Gowen


Farm Girl, the heart-warming journey of a girl coming of age on a 1920's Nebraska farm, is an authentic account of that era. It is a story told with warmth, gentle humor and amazing detail. Many cherished remembrances helped to shape the young girl into an educated, gracious woman--one of the worst dust storms in history when people got lost in their own yards, a beloved cousin who came to a sad end, the father who carried a burning kerosene tank out of the house with his bare hands.

Be transported to another time and place as you visit the Marker farm in western Nebraska. Where horses were back-up transportation for cars. Where children were educated in one-room schoolhouses. And when no one ever heard of television. If you like the books of Laura Ingalls Wilder or Willa Cather, you will enjoy Farm Girl. It is set in the locale of Willa Cather's Nebraska novels, and there is even a chapter in the book about the Marker Cather connections.

Richly photographed throughout with over 60 authentic photos documenting the people and places of the story. This historical, easy-to-read small book is suitable for use in the classroom from fifth grade up.


Karen Gowen: Born and raised in central Illinois, the daughter of a second-generation Methodist minister, I now live in South Jordan, Utah with my husband and three of our ten children. We have a back yard overgrown with fruit trees, vegetable garden and wildflowers, as well as a pond full of koi. I love to read, knit and watch Woody Allen movies. I graduated from BYU with a degree in English and American Literature. I've been writing for most of my life, published a few newspaper articles and sold a few stories to the Friend. The past few years I have finally been able to devote more time to writing. Two years ago I finished Farm Girl, story of a young girl growing up on a 1930's Nebraska farm. Uncut Diamonds is a longer, more ambitious work, a novel set in central Illinois, one part chick lit, one part family saga, it is like Steel Magnolias with Mormon characters. I am now working on the sequel, House of Diamonds.



Melinda and the Wild West by Linda Weaver Clarke


In 1896 Melinda Gamble—a very elegant, na├»ve young woman from Boston—decides to give up her life of monotonous comfort for the turbulent uncertainty of the still untamed Wild West. Driven by her intense desire to make a difference in the world, Melinda takes a job as a schoolteacher in the small town of Paris, Idaho, where she comes face-to-face with Butch Cassidy, a vicious grizzly bear, and a terrible blizzard that leaves her clinging to her life. But it’s a rugged rancher who challenges Melinda with the one thing for which she was least prepared—love.

When a rugged rancher and a determined schoolteacher meet, they tend to butt heads and clash with each encounter, but at the same time there seems to be an underlying interest in one another. In this story, Melinda is trying to help a rebellious student through acceptance and love, and at the same time, she is trying to understand her own heart.

Melinda and the Wild West: A Family Saga in Bear Lake, Idaho is the first in a series. The remaining books are as follows: Edith and the Mysterious Stranger, Jenny’s Dream, David and the Bear Lake Monster, and Elena, Woman of Courage.

Page One Literary Book Review wrote: “Linda Weaver Clarke displays an easy and excellent style of writing, blending adventure/romance/history/humor and courage. A Family Saga in Bear Lake, Idaho is an instant classic and should put this author on the literary map all over the world.”


Linda Weaver Clarke was raised on a farm surrounded by the rolling hills of southern Idaho and has made her home in southern Utah among the beautiful red mountains and desert heat. She is happily married and is the mother of six daughters and several grandchildren. Clarke received her Bachelor of Arts degree at Southern Utah University and travels throughout the United States, teaching a “Family Legacy Workshop,” encouraging others to turn their family history and autobiography into a variety of interesting stories.

Clarke is the author of the historical fiction series, “A Family Saga in Bear Lake, Idaho,” which includes the following novels: Melinda and the Wild West - a semi-finalist for the “Reviewers Choice Award 2007,” Edith and the Mysterious Stranger, Jenny’s Dream, David and the Bear Lake Monster, and Elena, Woman of Courage. A new Mystery series, The Adventures of John and Julia Evans, will soon be released, which includes the following novels to be released one at a time: Anasazi Intrigue, Mayan Intrigue, Montezuma Intrigue, and Desert Intrigue.

5 comments:

Th. said...

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Do you mind if I leave a comment for Karen here? The reason I want to leave it here is because her blog doesn't allow comments without signing up for Vox and, seriously, why would I do that? For instance, a few weeks ago she had a cool story about her and Marilyn Brown that I wanted to say happy things about but couldn't. It's hard to become part of an author's community when one is mute. I just though she should know that she might be missing out on more than just me.

And I'm happy to hear about Linda's book --- I collect books about Bear Lake. Mostly so I can give them to my mother then forget to borrow them back to read. But still. Glad to know about these.

Tamara Hart Heiner said...

Okay, this is totally random, we're having a conversation about Karen here. But I wanted to let you know she also has a blog on blogspot. It's http://karenjonesgowen.blogspot.com. Hope that helps!

karenjonesgowen said...

Yep, here's my blogspot url, come by and say hi!

Th. said...

.

Oh! Thanks! (I must have been thinking about a different Karen....)

Haley Hatch Freeman said...

Both these books look great. I grew up on a farm so both these books appeal to me personally.

I did the same thing TH. - I wanted to leave a comment for Karen on her blog but I'm not a Vox member either, thanks Tamara for the blogspot address.